Environmental Defenders

Uganda

Environmental Defenders works to protect environmental resources and human rights in the Lake Albert region of Uganda, which is threatened by oil and gas exploration, illegal logging, and large-scale agribusiness. Our partnership with Environmental Defenders will revive native savanna and grassland ecosystems on two sites, which, once restored, will absorb an estimated 30,033 metric tonnes of CO2 over 25 years. In order to scale this effort, we’ve provided financing, a modular seed bank, and operational support in building a nursery. 

The team focuses on creating sustainable livelihoods for communities and preserving Indigenous knowledge of local medicinal plants. They also provide farmers with seedlings for fruit trees, including avocado, grapefruit, and guava.

Two restoration sites will absorb an estimated 30,033 metric tonnes of CO2 over 25 years.

Two restoration sites will absorb an estimated 30,033 metric tonnes of CO2 over 25 years.

Hectares

182

Terraformation tools

Financing
Seed bank 
Nursery

PLANTS

180,000

TOP SPECIES

Tamarind (Tamarindus indicus)
Shea nut tree (Vitellaria paradoxa)
Natal elm (Celtis mildbraedii)

Indigenous knowledge of local plants is key to long-term restoration success.

Shea nut trees are one of many species needed to restore biodiversity.

Uganda's ecosystems face threats from oil and gas exploration, illegal logging, and large-scale agribusiness.

updates
Meet Our New Partner in Uganda: Environmental Defenders

Terraformation partners with Environmental Defenders to restore 450 acres of native savannah and dry grassland in Uganda's Lake Albert region.

Grassland in Uganda
sustainable development goals
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Let us help you

Ready to plant a forest or help one grow? Whether you’re looking to design a native forest or want to make an impact through sponsoring a project, our team can help.

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